Sunday, April 26, 2015

Joe Bev Hour Sunday Edition: The Lost OTR Show with Joe Bev A Date with Judy #3 Mother Runs Away and Cisco Kid #24: Poet of the Prairies



The Joe Bev Hour Sunday Edition

The Lost OTR Show with Joe Bev
A Date with Judy #3 Mother Runs Away and Cisco Kid #24: Poet of the Prairies
Cisco Kid Comic Book
A weekly omnibus of spoken word audio by veteran award winning radio producer and host Joe Bevilacqua (Joe Bev), featuring a rotating lineup which includes The Comedy-O-Rama, The Joe Bev Experience, Cartoon Carnival, and The Joe Bev Audio Theater, The Lost OTR Show, Audio Classics Archive, The J-OTR Show, The Voice Actor Show, and Lorie's Book Nook.

The Joe Bev Audio Theater is a one hour weekly anthology representing more than  forty years of storytelling by Joe Bev.



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A Date with Judy Comic Book
Wikipedia:

A Date with Judy is a comedy radio series aimed at a teenage audience which had a long run from 1941 to 1950.

The show began as a summer replacement for Bob Hope's show, sponsored by Pepsodent and airing on NBC from June 24 to September 16, 1941, with 14-year-old Ann Gillis in the title role. Dellie Ellis portrayed Judy Foster when the series returned the next summer (June 23 – September 15, 1942).

 
Louise Erickson, then 15, took over the role the following summer (June 30 – September 22, 1943) when the series, with Bristol Myers as its new sponsor, replaced The Eddie Cantor Show for the summer. Louise Erickson continued in the role of Judy over the next seven years as the series, sponsored by Tums, aired from January 18, 1944 to January 4, 1949. Ford Motors and Revere Cameras were the sponsors for the final season of the radio series on ABC from October 13, 1949 to May 25, 1950. Richard Crenna costarred on the series.

The series was so popular CBS developed a rival program Meet Corliss Archer starring Janet Waldo, which also enjoyed a long run and proved to be equally successful.


As the popularity of the radio series peaked, Jane Powell starred as Judy in the 1948 Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer movie A Date with Judy. Wallace Beery, Elizabeth Taylor, Robert Stack, and Carmen Miranda also headed the cast.

A television version of the show ran on ABC on Saturdays during daytime hours beginning on June 2, 1951. It originally starred Pat Crowley as Judy. The series moved to prime time during the summer of 1952 and was brought back again midway through the 1952-53 season. The series ended its run on September 30, 1953. This version featured Mary Linn Beller as Judy, John Gibson and Flora Campbell as her parents, Peter Avramo as her brother, and Jimmy Sommers as her sort-of boyfriend Oogie.

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The Cisco Kid is a fictional character found in numerous film, radio, television and comic book series based on the fictional Western character created by O. Henry in his 1907 short story "The Caballero's Way", published in the collection Heart of the West. In movies and television, the Kid was depicted as a heroic Mexican caballero, even though he was originally a cruel outlaw.

1994 The Cisco Kid - Jimmy Smits (Actor),
Cheech Marin (Actor), Luis Valdez (Director) 
Numerous movies featured the character, beginning in the silent film era with The Caballero's Way (1914). There is a discrepancy as to who actually played the part of the Cisco Kid.[citation needed] In the cemetery records[clarification needed] of Stanley Herbert Dunn it states that he played the part, but at IMDb.com it states that William Robert Dunn played the part.[citation needed]

For his portrayal of the Kid in the early sound film In Old Arizona (1928), Warner Baxter won the second Best Actor Oscar. This film was a revised version of 
Warner Baxter 
the original story, in which the Kid is portrayed in a positive light. It was directed by Irving Cummings and Raoul Walsh, who was originally slated to play the lead until a jackrabbit jumping through a windshield cost him an eye while on location.[1] In 1931, Fox Film Corporation produced a sound version with Baxter, Conchita Montenegro, and Edmund Lowe.

 Cesar Romero as Lopez
The movie series began with The Return of the Cisco Kid (1939), featuring Baxter in the title role with Cesar Romero as Lopez the brute, Chris-Pin Martin as the other sidekick, Gordito ("Fatty"), Lynn Bari as his mistaken love interest, Ann Carver, Henry Hull as her wayward grandfather, and Ward Bond in the lowest-billed role as "Tough", whose one scene shows him beaten into unconsciousness by the unscrupulous Sheriff McNally (Robert Barrat).

Romero took over the lead role of Cisco and Martin continued to play Gordito in six further films before the series was suspended with America's entry into World War II in 1941. Duncan Renaldo took over the reins as the Kid when Monogram Pictures revived the series in 1945 with The Cisco Kid Returns, which also introduced the Kid's best-known sidekick, Pancho, played by Martin Garralaga. Pancho also became established as his sidekick in other media. Neither Gordito nor Pancho is in the original story. After three Renaldo/Cisco films, Gilbert Roland played the character in a half-dozen 1946-1947 movies beginning with The Gay Cavalier (1946). Renaldo then returned to the role with Leo Carrillo as Pancho. They made five films, with Renaldo assuming the flowery "Cisco" outfit in the final film. He would wear that throughout the TV series that followed.

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Joe Bevilacqua, also known as Joe Bev, is primarily known as a radio theater dramatist, but his career has taken him into every aspect of show business, including stage, film, and television, as a producer, director, writer, actor, and even cartoonist. In 1971 his father bought him a cassette recorder, on which he created his first audio story, Willoughby and the Professor, acting all the voices himself at the age of twelve. In 1975 Daws Butler, the voice of Yogi Bear and many other Hanna-Barbera and Jay Ward cartoon characters, dubbed himself Bevilacqua’s personal mentor after hearing a 120-minute cassette of Willoughby improvisations. Since 1980 Bevilacqua has produced many award-winning radio programs for National Public Radio, Sirius-XM Satellite Radio, and others.
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