Wednesday, July 15, 2015

JAZZ-O-RAMA: Popeye Meets Betty Boop, the 78s of Helen Kane Meets Billy Costello


Popeye Meets Betty Boop,
the 78s of Helen Kane Meets Billy Costello

In honor of "Popeye Month" on BearManor Radio, the cans of spinach and garter belts will be flying when Joe Bev presents "Popeye Meets Betty Boop,  the 78s of Helen Kane Meets Billy Costello" on this week's The Jazz-O-Rama Hour, including:

I'm Pop-eye the Sailor Man - Billy Costello (1935)
I Wanna Be Loved By You - Helen Kane (1928)
Man on the Flying Trapeze - Billy Costello (1934)
Button Up Your Overcoat Helen Kane (1929)
The Teddy Bear's Picnic - Billy Costello (1935)
That's Why I'm Happy  - Helen Kane-  (1929)
Let's All Sing Like the Birdies Sing - Billy Costello (1935)
I Have to Have You - Helen Kane (1929)
Good Ship Yakihiki Dooda - Billy Costello (1935)
My Man is on the Make - Helen Kane (1930)
Nagasaki - Billy Costello (1935)
I Want to Be Bad  - Helen Kane (1929)
Dinah - Billy Costello (1935)
Dangerous Nan McGrew - Helen Kane (1930)
Tiger Rag - Billy Costello (1935)
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William "Billy" Costello a.k.a. "Red Pepper Sam", was the original voice of Popeye the Sailor in animated cartoons. Costello had worked with the Fleischer Studio as the voice of Gus the Gorilla on the Betty Boop radio show and they felt that the raspy voice he had used for that character would work for the new Popeye character they were planning. He was cast to provide the voice for the first Popeye cartoon, 1933's Popeye the Sailor. Costello appeared in the next 24 Popeye shorts until he was fired by the Fleischers, allegedly over "bad behavior," and was replaced with Jack Mercer. Costello's final appearance was in You Gotta Be A Football Hero (1935).


Helen Kane became known as the 'Boop-Boop-a-Doop Girl' because of her baby-talk, scat-singing tag line to that song. This version was recorded right when Kane's popularity started to reach its peak, and became her signature song. Kane's first performance at the Paramount Theater in Times Square proved to be her career's launching point. She was singing "That's My Weakness Now", when she interpolated the scat lyrics “boop-boop-a-doop.” This resonated with the flapper culture, and four days later, Helen Kane’s name went up in lights.Two years later, a cartoon character named Betty Boop was modeled after Kane. In 1930, Fleischer Studios animator Grim Natwick introduced a caricature of Helen Kane, with droopy dog ears and a squeaky singing voice, in the Talkartoons cartoon Dizzy Dishes. "Betty Boop", as the character was later dubbed, soon became popular and the star of her own cartoons. In 1932, Betty Boop was changed into a human, the long dog ears becoming hoop earrings. Helen Kane unsuccessfully sued Max Fleischer over the character.
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THE STREAMING PROGRAM STARTS AT 9 am & 9 pm EST

It's "Popeye the Sailor Month"
on The Bear Manor Radio Network!

Premiering July 1 at 9 pm ET, streamed at
http://www.bearmanorradio.com

Podcast athttp://www.waterlogg.com.

Your BearManor curator Professor Ludwig Von Whatchamacallit (Fred Frees) travels
in a van full of crazy Camp Waterlogg characters (created Joe Bev & Lorie Kellogg) in a series of improvised comic interstitials to introduce this month's line up!

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Louis Armstrong's New Orleans, with Wynton Marsalis:
 A Joe Bev Muiscal Sound Portrait


by Joe Bevilacqua Narrated by Joe Bevilacqua, Winton Marsalis, Donald Newlove, Leonard Lopate, Louis Armstrong
Length: 59 min.
Veteran radio producer Joe Bevilacqua hosts this entertaining, informative hour, recorded in the French Quarter of New Orleans and featuring jazz great Wynton Marsalis, jazz author and historian Donald Newlove, WNYC Radio talk show host Leonard Lopate, members of the Preservation Hall Jazz Band, and others, on the origins of jazz, and the life and music of legendary trumpeter Louis Armstrong. Also featured is the music of Armstrong throughout his long career, and rare recordings, including audio from a 1957 CBS TV documentary with Edward R. Murrow.

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Joe Bevilacquaalso known as Joe Bev, is primarily known as a radio theater dramatist, but his career has taken him into every aspect of show business, including stage, film, and television, as a producer, director, writer, actor, and even cartoonist. In 1971 his father bought him a cassette recorder, on which he created his first audio story, Willoughby and the Professor, acting all the voices himself at the age of twelve. In 1975 Daws Butler, the voice of Yogi Bear and many other Hanna-Barbera and Jay Ward cartoon characters, dubbed himself Bevilacqua’s personal mentor after hearing a 120-minute cassette of Willoughby improvisations. Since 1980 Bevilacqua has produced many award-winning radio programs for National Public Radio, Sirius-XM Satellite Radio, and others.
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